Chemistry and Physics Courses
CHE 001Laboratory AssistantChemistry1The purpose of this course is to give practical experience working in a chemistry laboratory. Student will gain this experience by preparing labs and setting up instruments for the chemistry labs. Counts as an activity credit.
CHE 112Introductory ChemistryChemistry4FreshmanFor non-science majors only. Introduction to the theories, concepts, and techniques of chemistry which have led to a modern understanding of the behavior of matter. Complementary, weekly laboratory exercises are designed to demonstrate practical applications of modern chemistry in everyday life. Although mathematics is not stressed, proficiency in high school algebra is expected. Consent of instructor is required for a student who has already earned credit for CHE 121. Satisfies laboratory sciences exploratory. Fall or spring.
CHE 121General Chemistry IChemistry5FreshmanAn introductory course in college chemistry. Stoichiometry, thermochemistry, atomic theory, chemical bonding, states of matter and phase changes, properties of selected elements and compounds, and solutions. Four hours lecture. Satisfies laboratory sciences requirement. Prerequisites: Two years of high school mathematics, one year of high school chemistry, or consent of instructor. Required corequisite: CHE 123. Fall.
CHE 122General Chemistry IIChemistry5FreshmanA continuation of CHE 121. Chemical equilibrium, kinetics, acids and bases, ionic equilibrium, electrochemistry, thermodynamics. Four hours lecture. Prerequisites: CHE 121 and 123. Required corequisite: CHE 124. Spring.
CHE 123General Chemistry I LabChemistry0FreshmanA lab course intended to supplement CHE 121 and provide an introduction to fundamental laboratory techniques, such as weighing, filtering, and titrating, as well as the accurate recording and analysis of scientific data. Three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: Two years of high school mathematics, one year of high school chemistry, or consent of instructor. Required corequisite: CHE 121. Fall.
CHE 124General Chemistry II LabChemistry0FreshmanA lab course intended to supplement CHE 122. (A continuation of CHE 123.) Students will apply skills learned in CHE 123 to more complex experiments, as well as be introduced to more advanced techniques. Three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: CHE 121 and CHE 123. Required corequisite: CHE 122. Spring.
CHE 221Organic Chemistry IChemistry3SophomoreAn introduction to the study of carbon and its compounds through an examination of the hydrocarbon, halide, alcohol, and carbonyl functional groups. Emphasis is placed on establishing relationships among structure, physical properties, and chemical activity. The mechanisms of substitution and elimination reactions are studied in detail. Three hours lecture. Taken concurrently with CHE 223. Prerequisite: CHE 122. Fall.
CHE 222Organic Chemistry IIChemistry3SophomoreA continuation of CHE 221. Additional functional groups and mechanisms are studied as well as the influence of functional groups on one another in multifunctional compounds. NMR and infrared spectroscopic techniques are used as tools to probe both structure and reactivity. Mass spectroscopy is applied to problems dealing with the structure. Three hours lecture. Taken concurrently with CHE 224. Prerequisite: CHE 221. Spring.
CHE 223Organic Chemistry Lab IChemistry1SophomoreMacroscale and microscale laboratory techniques, preparation and characteristic reactions of organic compounds. Three hours laboratory. Taken concurrently with CHE 221. Fall.
CHE 224Organic Chemistry Lab IIChemistry2SophomorePreparation and characteristic reactions of additional functional groups and qualitative analysis. Experience is also gained in spectroscopic techniques, molecular modeling, the retrieval of data from the chemical literature and formal report preparations. Four hours laboratory. Taken concurrently with CHE 222. Prerequisite: CHE 223. Spring.
CHE 227Analytical ChemistryChemistry4SophomoreAn introduction to the principles and methods of chemical analysis, including method development, elementary statistics, separation methods, gravimetric and volumetric analysis, and instrumental methods. The laboratory emphasizes the analysis of samples using analytical techniques. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory. Prerequisites: CHE 122 or consent of instructor. Fall.
CHE 322Spectroscopic Methods of AnalysisChemistry2JuniorAn advanced course in spectral interpretation of organic molecules. Techniques investigated include nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, mass spectra, infrared absorption, and ultraviolet absorption spectra. Prerequisites: CHE 222 and CHE 224. Spring, odd academic years.
CHE 334BiochemistryChemistry3JuniorAn introduction to the chemistry of biomolecules, metabolism, and biosynthesis. Three hours lecture. Note: This course may count toward either a Chemistry major or a Biology major, but not both. Same as BIO 334. Prerequisites: BIO 140, CHE 222 and CHE 224. Spring.
CHE 341Physical Chemistry IChemistry3JuniorChemical thermodynamics. A study of the laws of thermodynamics with particular emphasis on applications to thermochemistry, solutions, chemical equilibrium, phase equilibria, and electrochemistry. Three hours lecture. Prerequisites: CHE 122, MAT 135, PHY 202 or PHY 212. Highly preferred corequisite: CHE 343. Recommended MAT 142. Fall.
CHE 342Physical Chemistry IIChemistry3JuniorChemical kinetics, elementary quantum mechanics, atomic and molecular structure and spectroscopy. Three hours lecture. Prerequisites: PHY 201 or PHY 211 and 203. Spring, odd academic years.
CHE 343Physical Chemistry Lab IChemistry2JuniorAn introduction to the types of laboratory instrumentation and methods used every day by professional physical and inorganic chemists in research and industry. Substantial emphasis is placed on individual and team responsibility, careful and thoughtful planning, experimentation, data interpretation, and effective communication of results. Experiments will be closely associated with thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, and include some spectroscopy of primarily inorganic compounds. Four hours laboratory (including pre-lab lecture). Prerequisites: CHE 227 (or consent of instructor), MAT 135, and CHE 341 (or concurrently). Fall.
CHE 344Physical Chemistry Lab IIChemistry1JuniorAn introduction to the types of laboratory instrumentation and methods used every day by professional physical and inorganic chemists in research and industry. Substantial emphasis is placed on individual and team responsibility, careful and thoughtful planning, experimentation, data interpretation, and effective communication of results. Experiments will be closely associated with kinetics, electrochemistry, computational chemistry, and a continuation of spectroscopy. Three hours laboratory. Same as PHY 344. Prerequisites: CHE 341 and 343 (Current or past enrollment in CHE 342 is highly recommended). Spring.
CHE 357Radiation and HealthChemistry3This course will provide students with an introduction to the principles of radioactivity and its applications in medical diagnosis. A study of basic physics and chemistry as it applies to radiation and the human body (radio-biology) is followed by an overview of major topics in the field of medical physics: x-rays and their uses in medical imaging, physics of nuclear medicine imaging, ultrasound imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, and radiation therapy for cancer. The course will also include a summary of basic principles for measuring radiation exposure, and different methods of monitoring and protecting against chronic exposure to radiation. Fall, even years.
CHE 375Undergraduate Research in ChemistryChemistry2To receive academic credit for an undergraduate research experience students must complete a project proposal endorsed by a sponsoring science faculty member. The application will contain an overview of the project, specific project goals, deadlines for the completion of the project, and specific project outcomes that will be evaluated and used to determine the final grade. All projects must meet the following criteria: a) spending an average of 3 hours per week per credit hour (i.e. 6 hours/week during the semester for 2 credits) working on the project; b) writing a scientific paper summarizing the results of the study; c) preparing an electronic poster of the project results; d) maintaining a lab notebook, and e) presenting the results of the project to an audience (at least once per year). The project must be approved by the Chair (or designee) of the sponsoring department.
CHE 390Professional Development PlanningChemistry1JuniorThe primary objective of this course is to prepare students for the Professional Development Experience and chosen careers. Students will participate in professional development workshops and write a proposal for their senior year experience. Course Fee: $20. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. Fall.
CHE 392Techniques in Biotechnology & BiochemistChemistry3JuniorAn advanced investigation of genetic engineering and recombinant DNA technology, this course will investigate the theory and principles behind the new biological revolution in molecular biotechnology. Medical and industrial applications as well as ethical concerns will be discussed. Lab work will involve learning recombinant DNA techniques that are the cornerstone of molecular biology. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory. Note: This course may count toward either a Chemistry major or a Biology major, but not both. Same as BIO 392. Prerequisite: BIO 140, CHE 121, & CHE 122. Spring, even academic years.
CHE 434Advanced Inorganic ChemistryChemistry3SeniorTheoretical principles of inorganic chemistry. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, group theory, chemical bonding, coordination compounds, and the periodic classification of the elements. Three hours lecture. Prerequisites: CHE 222, CHE 227, and MAT 135 or consent of instructor. Spring, even academic years.
CHE 448Instrumental AnalysisChemistry3SeniorIntroduction to the theory and practice of modern analytical instrumentation. Chromatography, quantitative spectrometry, electroanalytical, and other instrumental techniques are discussed. Representative samples are analyzed using instrumental methods. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory. Prerequisites: CHE 227, or consent of instructor. Spring, even academic years.
CHE 472Chemistry SeminarChemistry2JuniorPresentation of current and historical topics in chemistry. This course emphasizes practice and presentation of oral and written reports. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. Fall.
CHE 499Senior Competency PracticumChemistry0SeniorAn examination taken by senior majors to assess their knowledge of the field of chemistry and their ability to apply this knowledge to solve practical problems. Normally given during the fall term of the student‘s senior year. Consists of an oral examination and/or a written Major Field Test from the Educational Testing Service. Passing grade D- or higher.
ESC 118Earth ScienceChemistry4FreshmanAn introduction to the principles of physical geology including plate tectonics, geological time, origins of rock types, erosion, and glaciation. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Satisfies laboratory sciences exploratory requirement. Fall and Spring.
AST 110AstronomyPhysics4FreshmanThe course will provide an overview of our modern understanding of the universe at an elementary level. Students will learn how following the Big Bang, elements were formed and hence the existence of all that is in the universe has been made possible. Special topics will include the Big Bang, solar system, planets and evidence of life on other planets, stars, galaxies, black holes, dark matter, dark energy, and expansion of the universe. This is an introductory course and no prior math experience is necessary. The course, therefore, starts out with a discussion of basic mathematical thinking necessary for a few portions of the course. The class will travel to various local astronomical sites observatories. Satisfies Scientific Thinking exploratory. Fall, odd academic years.
PHY 201General Physics I - AlgebraPhysics5SophomoreAn introductory course of a two-semester sequence of algebra-based physics that covers the following topics: linear motion, vector methods, Newton’s laws of motion, forces, gravitation, circular motion, work and energy, momentum, rotational motion, equilibrium, fluids, vibrations, waves, periodic motion and sound, fluids and solids. The course is appropriate for biology and chemistry majors and pre-professional students (pre-med, pre-dental, pre-optometry, exercise science, etc.). Four hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Co-requisite: PHY 203 (General Physics Lab I) & prerequisite: MAT 125 or MAT 135 and permission of the instructor (successful completion of a math pretest). Satisfies laboratory science exploratory requirement. Fall.
PHY 202General Physics II - AlgebraPhysics5SophomoreA second course of a two-semester sequence of algebra-based physics that covers the following topics: electrostatics, electricity and magnetism, DC and AC circuits, light and geometric optics, atomic and nuclear structure, heat and thermodynamics. Four hours lecture, two hours laboratory. The course is appropriate for biology majors and pre-professional students (pre-med, pre-dental, pre-optometry, etc.). Co-requisite: PHY 204 (General Physics Lab II) & Prerequisite: PHY 201 and PHY 203. Spring.
PHY 203General Physics I LabPhysics0Lab portion of General Physics I. Must be taken concurrently with PHY 201.
PHY 204General Physics II LabPhysics0Lab portion of General Physics II. Must be taken concurrently with PHY 202.
PHY 211General Physics I-CalculusPhysics5SophomoreAn introductory course of a two-semester sequence of calculus-based physics that introduces the theories, concepts, and techniques of mechanics (kinematics, work and energy, dynamics, rotation, gravitation, and waves) and the application of mechanics to heat flow, called thermodynamics. The course is appropriate for chemistry, physics, mathematics and engineering majors. Four hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Co-requisite: PHY 203 (General Physics Lab I) & pre-requisite: MAT 135. Satisfies laboratory sciences exploratory requirement. Fall.
PHY 212General Physics II - CalculusPhysics5SophomoreA second course of a two-semester sequence of calculus-based physics. Topics of study include: electricity and magnetism, DC and AC circuits, and geometrical and physical optics, light, and atomic physics. Four hours lecture, two hours laboratory. The course is appropriate for chemistry, physics, mathematics and engineering majors. Four hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Co-requisite: PHY 204. Prerequisite: PHY 211 and PHY 203. Spring.
PHY 240Modern PhysicsPhysics3SophomoreAn examination of the breakdown of classical physics and the rise of quantum theory. Topics include: special and general relativity, the kinetic theory of gases, an introduction to quantum mechanics and its application to atomic structure, solid state physics, and nuclear physics. The course includes laboratory study of relativistic beta spectroscopy, black body radiation, and the photoelectric effect. Prerequisite: PHY 202. Offered on demand.
PHY 341Physical Chemistry IPhysics3JuniorChemical thermodynamics. A study of the laws of thermodynamics with particular emphasis on applications to thermochemistry, solutions, chemical equilibrium, phase equilibria, and electrochemistry. Three hours lecture. Same as CHE 341. Prerequisites: CHE 122, MAT 135 and 140, PHY 202. Recommended: MAT 142. Fall.
PHY 342Physical Chemistry IIPhysics3JuniorChemical kinetics, elementary quantum mechanics, atomic and molecular structure and spectroscopy. Three hours lecture. Same as CHE 342. Prerequisites: PHY/CHE 341 or permission of instructor. Spring, odd academic years.
PHY 343Physical Chemistry Lab IPhysics2JuniorAn introduction to the types of laboratory instrumentation and methods used every day by professional physical and inorganic chemists in research and industry. Substantial emphasis is placed on individual and team responsibility, careful and thoughtful planning, experimentation, data interpretation, and effective communication of results. Experiments will be closely associated with thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, and include some spectroscopy of primarily inorganic compounds. Four hours laboratory (including pre-lab lecture). Same as CHE 343. Prerequisites: CHE 227, MAT 135, and CHE 341 (or concurrently). Fall.
PHY 344Physical Chemistry Lab IIPhysics1JuniorAn introduction to the types of laboratory instrumentation and methods used every day by professional physical and inorganic chemists in research and industry. Substantial emphasis is placed on individual and team responsibility, careful and thoughtful planning, experimentation, data interpretation, and e®ective communication of results. Experiments will be closely associated with kinetics, electrochemistry, computational chemistry, and a continuation of spectroscopy. Three hours laboratory. Same as CHE 344. Prerequisites: CHE 341 and 342/343 (Current or past enrollment in CHE 342 is highly recommended). Spring.
PHY 355UltrasonographyPhysics3JuniorUltrasound is integrated in the health professions and medical education curriculum extensively because of its non-invasive nature and diagnostic utility. The course is divided into four sections: introductory ultrasonography, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and abdominal ultrasonography. The course provides hands on training for proper utilization and appropriate operation of ultrasound equipment to assess various regions of the body, as well as a review of Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma (FAST) assessment. Spring, odd years rotating with PHY 365. Same as BIO 355.
PHY 357Radiation and HealthPhysics3JuniorThis course will provide students with an introduction to the principles of radioactivity and its applications in medical diagnosis. A study of basic physics and chemistry as it applies to radiation and the human body (radio-biology) is followed by an overview of major topics in the field of medical physics: x-rays and their uses in medical imaging, physics of nuclear medicine imaging, ultrasound imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, and radiation therapy for cancer. The course will also include a summary of basic principles for measuring radiation exposure, and different methods of monitoring and protecting against chronic exposure to radiation. Fall, even years.
PHY 365Biomedical OpticsPhysics3This course will be broadly divided into three categories: geometrical, physical, and visual optics that are pertinent to human-eye-related biomedical and clinical applications. It will begin with the discussion of foundations of geometrical optics describing the behavior of light as rays during reflection, refraction, and dispersion, as well as analyzing optical images, designs and systems and the associated aberrations. The physical-optics aspect of this course introduces the wave model of light propagation and applies it in describing various phenomena like refraction and reflection, dispersion, interference, polarization, and diffraction. This will be followed by a concise deliberation of a few topics related to quantum nature of light and quantum optics. The final part of the course will address optics of human eye emphasizing the propagation and interactions of light in biological tissues and physiology of a visual system. Spring, odd years rotating with PHY 357.
PHY 375Undergraduate Research in PhysicsPhysics1To receive academic credit for an undergraduate research experience students must complete a project proposal endorsed by a sponsoring science faculty member. The application will contain an overview of the project, specific project goals, deadlines for the completion of the project, and specific project outcomes that will be evaluated and used to determine the final grade. All projects must meet the following criteria: a) spending an average of 3 hours per week per credit hour (i.e. 6 hours/week during the semester for 2 credits) working on the project; b) writing a scientific paper summarizing the results of the study; c) preparing an electronic poster of the project results; d) maintaining a lab notebook, and e) presenting the results of the project to an audience (at least once per year). The project must be approved by the Chair (or designee) of the sponsoring department. Same as PHY 375

 

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