Science Courses

Biology

BIO 001Laboratory AssistantBiology1Students will assist a faculty member in setting up the labs, lab instruction, research, or maintaining biological facilities. While doing this, students will learn proper laboratory procedure techniques. The course is highly recommended for graduate school bound students or students interested in science teaching. Counts as an activity course credit. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Fall and spring.
BIO 114General BiologyBiology4FreshmanExplores the functional and organizational principles of life from the cellular to the ecosystem level using evolutionary theory as the unifying framework. Topics in human and plant biology are used to illustrate basic biological concepts. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Satisfies laboratory sciences requirement. Fall and spring.
BIO 121Medical Term & Doc for Allied Hlth Prof2This course presents a basic study of medical terminology. Prefixes, suffixes, root words, combining forms, special endings, plural forms, abbreviations, and symbols are included in the content. This course is intended to assist those studying in medical and allied health-care fields by learning a system for defining, using, spelling, and pronouncing medical words. Basic principles of documentation and the various forms used by allied health-care professionals are also encompassed in this course. Same as KIN 121. Fall.
BIO 134Principles of BiologyBiology4FreshmanThis course is the first semester of a two semester sequence in biology for biology and chemistry majors. The purpose of this course is to provide science majors with a basic understanding of biology and aid in the development of critical thinking skills. Topics including Mendelian and population genetics, natural selection and evolution will be discussed. Four hours lecture and discussion, two hours laboratory. Satisfies laboratory sciences requirement. Fall.
BIO 140Cell BiologyBiology4FreshmanA detailed understanding of cells will be developed in relationship to the following topics: ultra structure, biochemistry, metabolism, reproduction, molecular genetics, gene regulation, membrane transport, photosynthesis and respiration. Four hours lecture and discussion, two hours laboratory. Satisfies laboratory sciences requirement. Prerequisite: minimum grade of C- in BIO 134, or permission of the instructor. Spring
BIO 210Human Anatomy and Physiology IBiology4SophomoreThis is the first of a two-semester sequence in which human anatomy and physiology are studied using a body systems approach, with emphasis on the interrelationships between form and function at the gross and microscopic levels of organization. The first semester covers an introduction to scientific principles, principles of cell biology, histology, the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and respiratory systems. The laboratory includes physiological investigations, and dissections of fetal pigs and vertebrate organs. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Prerequisite: BIO 140. Fall
BIO 215Human Anatomy and Physiology IIBiology4SophomoreThis is the second of a two-semester sequence in which human anatomy and physiology are studied using a body systems approach with emphasis on the interrelationships between form and function at the gross and microscopic levels of organization. The second semester covers the nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. The laboratory includes physiological investigations, and dissections of cats and vertebrate organs. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Satisfies laboratory sciences requirement. Prerequisite: BIO 210 or permission of instructor. Spring.
BIO 221BotanyBiology4SophomorePrinciples of form, function, growth, reproduction, physiology, classification and evolution in algae, fungi and plants. Flowering plants will be keyed. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 140. Spring.
BIO 225BioethicsBiology3SophomoreIn this course students will explore ethical issues relating to medicine and scientific research. Each topic will be examined using a values-based analysis, and awareness of leadership principles. Emphasis will be on biological principles, decision-making, and conflict management. Specific topics will include: use of humans in research, genetics and fertility, ?end of life issues,? and topics concerning embryos, cloning, and genetic engineering. Satisfies philosophy and religion exploratory requirement. Prerequisite: BIO 114, BIO 115, or BIO 134. Spring, odd academic years.
BIO 230ZoologyBiology4SophomoreA survey of animals with an emphasis on evolution, structure, function, and life cycles of representative taxa. Three hours lecture and three hours lab. Prerequisite: BIO 140. Fall.
BIO 240EcologyBiology4SophomoreRelationship of plants and animals to their biological and physical environment, particularly in Indiana. Field trips to representative habitats. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory. Prerequisite: BIO 140 or consent of instructor. Fall.
BIO 300Topics in BiologyBiology3JuniorA topic of current interest in biology will be taught. Topics will vary depending on faculty interest. Course will be offered upon the request of a faculty member and with approval of the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
BIO 320Conservation BiologyBiology3SophomoreIn this course, students will be introduced to the principles of conservation biology. Important topics to be considered will include species diversity, habitat preservation, habitat management, invasive species, and endangered species. In addition to the unifying principles of conservation biology, local, national and international case studies will be examined. Lecture only. Prerequisites: BIO 134 and BIO 140. Fall, odd academic years.
BIO 322OrnithologyBiology3JuniorAn introductory course in general ornithology. Emphasizes field identification, ecology, and behavior of birds. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory. Satisfies laboratory sciences requirement. Spring, even academic years.
BIO 334BiochemistryChemistry3JuniorAn introduction to the chemistry of biomolecules, metabolism, and biosynthesis. Three hours lecture. Note: This course may count toward either a Biology major or a Chemistry major, but not both. Same as CHE 334. Prerequisites: BIO 140, CHE 222 and CHE 224. Spring
BIO 335Plant CommunitiesBiology3JuniorAn introduction to the plant communities in Indiana with emphasis on plant identification, plant associations, and exotic species. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory. Prerequisite: BIO 114 or BIO 134. Fall, even academic years.
BIO 350GeneticsBiology4JuniorA study of the principles of heredity, including Mendelian, molecular, and population genetics. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 140, junior status or consent of instructor. Spring.
BIO 360Animal PhysiologyBiology4JuniorExplores the chemistry and physics of the living animal. Topics include cellular physiology, metabolism, organ systems, and mechanisms of control. Emphasis is placed on specific adaptive mechanisms of the animal to its environment. The course stresses interpretation of experimental results both in the lecture and lab. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 140; CHE 121 and 122. Fall.
BIO 372Exercise PhysiologyBiology3JuniorExercise physiology is the study of acute and chronic adaptions of the body’s physiological systems to movement and physical conditioning. Physiological foundations and the development of physiological fitness components will be discussed. A laboratory component is integrated into class sessions. Same as EXE 372. Prerequisites: BIO 110 or BIO 115 and BIO 120. Fall
BIO 372LExercise Physiology LabBiology0JuniorLab portion of Exercise Physiology. Must be taken concurrently with BIO 372.
BIO 373MicrobiologyBiology4JuniorMorphology, classification, physiology, genetics, and cultivation of bacteria. The relationship of micro-organisms to human health and the human immune system is discussed in detail. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 140 and consent of instructor. Fall.
BIO 374Advanced Cell and Molecular BiologyBiology3JuniorThis course is an in-depth, advanced look at cellular and molecular processes applicable to both research and medicine. Mechanisms of DNA repair, transcription and translation regulation, cell communication and cellular transport will be discussed. Much of this course will rely on the analysis of primary literature and interpretation of experimental data to understand cell biology in the context of cancer and other cellular dysfunctions. The course is 3 hours of lecture with no laboratory component. Prerequisites: BIO 140 is required, BIO 350 is preferred but not required. Spring, odd years.
BIO 375Undergraduate Research in BiologyBiology2JuniorTo receive academic credit for an undergraduate research experience students must complete a project proposal endorsed by a sponsoring science faculty member. The application will contain an overview of the project, specific project goals, deadlines for the completion of the project, and specific project outcomes that will be evaluated and used to determine the final grade. All projects must meet the following criteria: a) spending an average of 6 hours/week during the semester (for 2 credits) working on the project; b) writing a scientific paper summarizing the results of the study; c) preparing an electronic poster of the project results; d) maintaining a lab notebook, and e) presenting the results of the project to an audience. The project must be approved by the Chair (or designee) of the sponsoring department.
BIO 380Field BiologyBiology2JuniorOne-to-three-week field trips to various areas in the United States. Natural history surveys and ecological analysis of animal and plant communities will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Spring. There is a variable course fee depending on changing travel costs. See instructor for exact amount.
BIO 382Comparative Animal BehaviorBiology3An introductory course to animal behavior (ethnology). The genetics, physiology, ecology, and history of behavior from an evolutionary perspective are studied. Prerequisites: BIO 140. PSY 117 recommended but not required. Spring, odd academic years.
BIO 387BiomechanicsBiology3The course will provide the student with a mechanical examination of the motion of the human body. Application of anatomical, physiological and mechanical data will be used to explain and predict movements of the body to improve technique or prevent injury. A laboratory experience is integrated into class sessions. Same as EXE 387. Prerequisites: BIO 110 or BIO 115, BIO 120; EXE 234 and 372. Spring.
BIO 387LBiomechanics LabBiology0JuniorLab portion of Biomechanics. Must be taken concurrently with BIO 387.
BIO 390Professional Development PlanningBiology1JuniorThe primary objective of this course is to prepare students for the Professional Development Experience and chosen careers. Students will participate in professional development workshops. Course Fee: $20. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. Fall.
BIO 392Techniques in Biotechnology & BiochemistBiology3JuniorStudents in this course will investigate the myriad of technology available to study DNA, RNA and proteins covering both the theories and applications in research, medical, and industrial settings. Techniques covered will include use of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms in recombinant DNA technologies, gene expression microarrays, protein analysis by Western blot, and protein interaction analysis in yeast and higher eukaryotes. Lab work involves using techniques which are the foundation for research in molecular biology. Four hours laboratory. Note: This course may count toward either a Biology major or a Chemistry major, but not both. Same as CHE 392. Prerequisite BIO 140. Spring, even years.
BIO 470Biology SeminarBiology2SeniorBiology topics of current or special interest will be researched and presented by students. Prerequisite: At least junior class standing and prerequisites of BIO 230 and BIO 390. Fall and spring (as needed).
BIO 482Biology PracticumBiology1SeniorA supervised, pre-approved experience which allows a student to pursue specific learning goals and/or be involved in a field experience during the regular academic semester.
BIO 490Independent Study: BiologyBiology1SeniorCourse is designed to encourage student initiative and to provide a degree of flexibility in the departmental program. Normally the subject is not sufficiently or appropriately covered in regular departmental course offerings. Departmental consent is required.
BIO 499Senior Competency PracticumBiology0SeniorA written comprehensive, objective, and essay examination covering basic biological principles and material from required biology courses. Grade of D- or better required. Spring, senior year.
ESC 118Earth ScienceBiology4FreshmanAn introduction to the principles of physical geology including plate tectonics, geological time, origins of rock types, erosion, and glaciation. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Satisfies laboratory sciences exploratory requirement. Fall and Spring.

 

Chemistry and Physics

CHE 001Laboratory AssistantChemistry1The purpose of this course is to give practical experience working in a chemistry laboratory. Student will gain this experience by preparing labs and setting up instruments for the chemistry labs. Counts as an activity credit.
CHE 112Introductory ChemistryChemistry4FreshmanFor non-science majors only. Introduction to the theories, concepts, and techniques of chemistry which have led to a modern understanding of the behavior of matter. Complementary, weekly laboratory exercises are designed to demonstrate practical applications of modern chemistry in everyday life. Although mathematics is not stressed, proficiency in high school algebra is expected. Consent of instructor is required for a student who has already earned credit for CHE 121. Satisfies laboratory sciences exploratory. Fall or spring.
CHE 121General Chemistry IChemistry5FreshmanAn introductory course in college chemistry. Stoichiometry, thermochemistry, atomic theory, chemical bonding, states of matter and phase changes, properties of selected elements and compounds, and solutions. Four hours lecture. Satisfies laboratory sciences requirement. Prerequisites: Two years of high school mathematics, one year of high school chemistry, or consent of instructor. Required corequisite: CHE 123. Fall.
CHE 122General Chemistry IIChemistry5FreshmanA continuation of CHE 121. Chemical equilibrium, kinetics, acids and bases, ionic equilibrium, electrochemistry, thermodynamics. Four hours lecture. Prerequisites: CHE 121 and 123. Required corequisite: CHE 124. Spring.
CHE 123General Chemistry I LabChemistry0FreshmanA lab course intended to supplement CHE 121 and provide an introduction to fundamental laboratory techniques, such as weighing, filtering, and titrating, as well as the accurate recording and analysis of scientific data. Three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: Two years of high school mathematics, one year of high school chemistry, or consent of instructor. Required corequisite: CHE 121. Fall.
CHE 124General Chemistry II LabChemistry0FreshmanA lab course intended to supplement CHE 122. (A continuation of CHE 123.) Students will apply skills learned in CHE 123 to more complex experiments, as well as be introduced to more advanced techniques. Three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: CHE 121 and CHE 123. Required corequisite: CHE 122. Spring.
CHE 221Organic Chemistry IChemistry3SophomoreAn introduction to the study of carbon and its compounds through an examination of the hydrocarbon, halide, alcohol, and carbonyl functional groups. Emphasis is placed on establishing relationships among structure, physical properties, and chemical activity. The mechanisms of substitution and elimination reactions are studied in detail. Three hours lecture. Taken concurrently with CHE 223. Prerequisite: CHE 122. Fall.
CHE 222Organic Chemistry IIChemistry3SophomoreA continuation of CHE 221. Additional functional groups and mechanisms are studied as well as the influence of functional groups on one another in multifunctional compounds. NMR and infrared spectroscopic techniques are used as tools to probe both structure and reactivity. Mass spectroscopy is applied to problems dealing with the structure. Three hours lecture. Taken concurrently with CHE 224 . Prerequisite: CHE 221. Spring.
CHE 223Organic Chemistry Lab IChemistry1SophomoreMacroscale and microscale laboratory techniques, preparation and characteristic reactions of organic compounds. Three hours laboratory. Taken concurrently with CHE 221. Fall.
CHE 224Organic Chemistry Lab IIChemistry2SophomorePreparation and characteristic reactions of additional functional groups and qualitative analysis. Experience is also gained in spectroscopic techniques, molecular modeling, the retrieval of data from the chemical literature and formal report preparations. Four hours laboratory. Taken concurrently with CHE 222. Prerequisite: CHE 223. Spring.
CHE 227Analytical ChemistryChemistry4SophomoreAn introduction to the principles and methods of chemical analysis, including method development, elementary statistics, separation methods, gravimetric and volumetric analysis, and instrumental methods. The laboratory emphasizes the analysis of samples using analytical techniques. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory. Prerequisites: CHE 122 or consent of instructor. Fall.
CHE 300Topics in ChemistryChemistry3JuniorA topic of current interest in chemistry will be taught. Topics will vary depending on faculty interest. Course will be offered upon request of a faculty member and with approval of the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
CHE 322Spectroscopic Methods of AnalysisChemistry2JuniorAn advanced course in spectral interpretation of organic molecules. Techniques investigated include nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, mass spectra, infrared absorption, and ultraviolet absorption spectra. Prerequisites: CHE 222 and CHE 224. Spring, odd academic years.
CHE 334BiochemistryChemistry3JuniorAn introduction to the chemistry of biomolecules, metabolism, and biosynthesis. Three hours lecture. Note: This course may count toward either a Chemistry major or a Biology major, but not both. Same as BIO 334. Prerequisites: BIO 140, CHE 222 and CHE 224. Spring.
CHE 341Physical Chemistry IChemistry3JuniorChemical thermodynamics. A study of the laws of thermodynamics with particular emphasis on applications to thermochemistry, solutions, chemical equilibrium, phase equilibria, and electrochemistry. Three hours lecture. Prerequisites: CHE 122, MAT 135, PHY 202. Highly preferred corequisite: CHE 343. Recommended MAT 142. Fall.
CHE 342Physical Chemistry IIChemistry3JuniorChemical kinetics, elementary quantum mechanics, atomic and molecular structure and spectroscopy. Three hours lecture. Prerequisites: PHY 201. Spring, odd academic years.
CHE 343Physical Chemistry Lab IChemistry2JuniorAn introduction to the types of laboratory instrumentation and methods used every day by professional physical and inorganic chemists in research and industry. Substantial emphasis is placed on individual and team responsibility, careful and thoughtful planning, experimentation, data interpretation, and effective communication of results. Experiments will be closely associated with thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, and include some spectroscopy of primarily inorganic compounds. Four hours laboratory (including pre-lab lecture). Prerequisites: CHE 227 (or consent of instructor), MAT 135, and CHE 341 (or concurrently). Fall.
CHE 344Physical Chemistry Lab IIChemistry1JuniorAn introduction to the types of laboratory instrumentation and methods used every day by professional physical and inorganic chemists in research and industry. Substantial emphasis is placed on individual and team responsibility, careful and thoughtful planning, experimentation, data interpretation, and effective communication of results. Experiments will be closely associated with kinetics, electrochemistry, computational chemistry, and a continuation of spectroscopy. Three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: CHE 341 and 343 (Current or past enrollment in CHE 342 is highly recommended). Spring.
CHE 357Radiation and HealthChemistry3This course will provide students with an introduction to the principles of radioactivity and its applications in medical diagnosis. A study of basic physics and chemistry as it applies to radiation and the human body (radio-biology) is followed by an overview of major topics in the field of medical physics: x-rays and their uses in medical imaging, physics of nuclear medicine imaging, ultrasound imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, and radiation therapy for cancer. The course will also include a summary of basic principles for measuring radiation exposure, and different methods of monitoring and protecting against chronic exposure to radiation. Fall, even years.
CHE 375Undergraduate Research in ChemistryChemistry2To receive academic credit for an undergraduate research experience students must complete a project proposal endorsed by a sponsoring science faculty member. The application will contain an overview of the project, specific project goals, deadlines for the completion of the project, and specific project outcomes that will be evaluated and used to determine the final grade. All projects must meet the following criteria: a) spending an average of 3 hours per week per credit hour (i.e. 6 hours/week during the semester for 2 credits) working on the project; b) writing a scientific paper summarizing the results of the study; c) preparing an electronic poster of the project results; d) maintaining a lab notebook, and e) presenting the results of the project to an audience (at least once per year). The project must be approved by the Chair (or designee) of the sponsoring department.
CHE 390Professional Development PlanningChemistry1JuniorThe primary objective of this course is to prepare students for the Professional Development Experience and chosen careers. Students will participate in professional development workshops and write a proposal for their senior year experience. Course Fee: $20. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. Fall.
CHE 392Techniques in Biotechnology & BiochemistChemistry3JuniorAn advanced investigation of genetic engineering and recombinant DNA technology, this course will investigate the theory and principles behind the new biological revolution in molecular biotechnology. Medical and industrial applications as well as ethical concerns will be discussed. Lab work will involve learning recombinant DNA techniques that are the cornerstone of molecular biology. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory. Note: This course may count toward either a Chemistry major or a Biology major, but not both. Note: this course may count toward either a Chemistry major or a Biology major but not both. Same as BIO 392. Prerequisite: BIO 140. Spring, even academic years.
CHE 434Advanced Inorganic ChemistryChemistry3SeniorTheoretical principles of inorganic chemistry. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, group theory, chemical bonding, coordination compounds, and the periodic classification of the elements. Three hours lecture. Prerequisites: CHE 222, CHE 227, and MAT 135 or consent of instructor. Spring, even academic years.
CHE 448Instrumental AnalysisChemistry3SeniorIntroduction to the theory and practice of modern analytical instrumentation. Chromatography, quantitative spectrometry, electroanalytical, and other instrumental techniques are discussed. Representative samples are analyzed using instrumental methods. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory. Prerequisites: CHE 227, or consent of instructor. Spring, even academic years.
CHE 472Chemistry SeminarChemistry2JuniorPresentation of current and historical topics in chemistry. This course emphasizes practice and presentation of oral and written reports. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. Fall.
CHE 482Chemistry PracticumChemistry2SeniorA supervised, pre-approved experience which allows a student to pursue specific learning goals and/or be involved in a field experience during the regular academic semester.
CHE 490Chemistry Independent StudyChemistry1SeniorIndependent investigation of some problem in one of the fields of chemistry by students who have completed the minimum requirements for a major in chemistry. Prerequisite: consent of department.
CHE 499Senior Competency PracticumChemistry0SeniorAn examination taken by senior majors to assess their knowledge of the field of chemistry and their ability to apply this knowledge to solve practical problems. Normally given during the fall term of the student‘s senior year. Consists of an oral examination and/or a written Major Field Test from the Educational Testing Service. Passing grade D- or higher.
PHY 201General Physics I - AlgebraPhysics5SophomoreAn introductory course of a two-semester sequence of algebra-based physics that covers the following topics: linear motion, vector methods, Newton’s laws of motion, forces, gravitation, circular motion, work and energy, momentum, rotational motion, equilibrium, fluids, vibrations, waves, periodic motion and sound, fluids and solids. The course is appropriate for biology and chemistry majors and pre-professional students (pre-med, pre-dental, pre-optometry, exercise science, etc.). Four hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Co-requisite: PHY 203 (General Physics Lab I) & prerequisite: MAT 126 or MAT 135 and permission of the instructor (successful completion of a math pretest). Satisfies laboratory science exploratory requirement. Fall.
PHY 202General Physics II - AlgebraPhysics5SophomoreA second course of a two-semester sequence of algebra-based physics that covers the following topics: electrostatics, electricity and magnetism, DC and AC circuits, light and geometric optics, atomic and nuclear structure, heat and thermodynamics. Four hours lecture, two hours laboratory. The course is appropriate for biology majors and pre-professional students (pre-med, pre-dental, pre-optometry, etc.). Co-requisite: PHY 204 (General Physics Lab II) & Prerequisite: PHY 201 and PHY 203. Spring.
PHY 203General Physics I LabPhysics0Lab portion of General Physics I. Must be taken concurrently with PHY 201.
PHY 204General Physics II LabPhysics0Lab portion of General Physics II. Must be taken concurrently with PHY 202.
PHY 211General Physics I-CalculusChemistry5SophomoreAn introductory course of a two-semester sequence of calculus-based physics that introduces the theories, concepts, and techniques of mechanics (kinematics, work and energy, dynamics, rotation, gravitation, and waves) and the application of mechanics to heat flow, called thermodynamics. The course is appropriate for chemistry, physics, mathematics and engineering majors. Four hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Co-requisite: PHY 203 (General Physics Lab I) & pre-requisite: MAT 135. Satisfies laboratory sciences exploratory requirement. Fall.
PHY 212General Physics II - CalculusPhysics5SophomoreA second course of a two-semester sequence of calculus-based physics. Topics of study include: electricity and magnetism, DC and AC circuits, and geometrical and physical optics, light, and atomic physics. Four hours lecture, two hours laboratory. The course is appropriate for chemistry, physics, mathematics and engineering majors. Four hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Co-requisite: PHY 204. Prerequisite: PHY 211 and PHY 203. Spring.
PHY 240Modern PhysicsPhysics3SophomoreAn examination of the breakdown of classical physics and the rise of quantum theory. Topics include: special and general relativity, the kinetic theory of gases, an introduction to quantum mechanics and its application to atomic structure, solid state physics, and nuclear physics. The course includes laboratory study of relativistic beta spectroscopy, black body radiation, and the photoelectric effect. Prerequisite: PHY 202. Offered on demand.
PHY 300Topics in PhysicsPhysics3JuniorTopics in Physics
PHY 355UltrasonographyNatural Sciences Division3JuniorUltrasound is integrated in the health professions and medical education curriculum extensively because of its non-invasive nature and diagnostic utility. The course is divided into four sections: introductory ultrasonography, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and abdominal ultrasonography. The course provides hands on training for proper utilization and appropriate operation of ultrasound equipment to assess various regions of the body, as well as a reveiw of Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma (FAST) assessment. Spring, odd years rotating with PHY 365.
PHY 357Radiation and HealthNatural Sciences Division3JuniorThis course will provide students with an introduction to the principles of radioactivity and its applications in medical diagnosis. A study of basic physics and chemistry as it applies to radiation and the human body (radio-biology) is followed by an overview of major topics in the field of medical physics: x-rays and their uses in medical imaging, physics of nuclear medicine imaging, ultrasound imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, and radiation therapy for cancer. The course will also include a summary of basic principles for measuring radiation exposure, and different methods of monitoring and protecting against chronic exposure to radiation. Fall, even years.
PHY 365Biomedical OpticsNatural Sciences Division3This course will be broadly divided into three categories: geometrical, physical, and visual optics that are pertinent to human-eye-related biomedical and clinical applications. It will begin with the discussion of foundations of geometrical optics describing the behavior of light as rays during reflection, refraction, and dispersion, as well as analyzing optical images, designs and systems and the associated aberrations. The physical-optics aspect of this course introduces the wave model of light propagation and applies it in describing various phenomena like refraction and reflection, dispersion, interference, polarization, and diffraction. This will be followed by a concise deliberation of a few topics related to quantum nature of light and quantum optics. The final part of the course will address optics of human eye emphasizing the propagation and interactions of light in biological tissues and physiology of a visual system. Spring, odd years rotating with PHY 357.
PHY 375Undergraduate Research in PhysicsChemistry1To receive academic credit for an undergraduate research experience students must complete a project proposal endorsed by a sponsoring science faculty member. The application will contain an overview of the project, specific project goals, deadlines for the completion of the project, and specific project outcomes that will be evaluated and used to determine the final grade. All projects must meet the following criteria: a) spending an average of 3 hours per week per credit hour (i.e. 6 hours/week during the semester for 2 credits) working on the project; b) writing a scientific paper summarizing the results of the study; c) preparing an electronic poster of the project results; d) maintaining a lab notebook, and e) presenting the results of the project to an audience (at least once per year). The project must be approved by the Chair (or designee) of the sponsoring department. Same as PHY 375
PHY 482Physics PracticumPhysics1SeniorSupervised, pre-approved academic credit awarded for qualified work in an industrial, government, or academic research laboratory. Departmental consent is required.
PHY 490Physics Independent StudyPhysics1SeniorIndividualized reading or research project in an area not covered in regular courses. Departmental consent is required.